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may be offensive. c-span: at what point did you decide to do a documentary on the detroit? >> guest: i'm from the area. i was born and raised in the dietrich areas of there was a personal connection. i never considered making a film in detroit or with any personal ties to myself whatsoever. but my co-director and body, rachel, started talking about the city of detroit in late 2008, because i would return home and things seemed to be getting worse and worse. it was all pretty bad when i grew up there in the 80's. so to see the crisis spread out further and further into the suburbs and a lot of people i knew were leaving and we started discussing what was the future of this place, but wouldn't like, then in october of 2009i came with my crew for three days as an experiment and filmed in a city just as an outsider and talked to a few people and absolutely riveted by the people and the place. and i thought there's definitely a movie here. i'm not sure what it is that we need to make a film and in detroit. c-span: i read that you're father had an impact on you and his business is over the y
came back right after the riots and there was a people's inquiry set up in detroit and rosa parks was a member of the commission. it was the people's commission. the sit down on the bus woman, she was on this commission and a radical lawyer who we all loved, a young black lawyer who was a radical, was the guy who organized it and after that to me was a parks was not just an icon. she was a person who i saw that had all kinds of activist things that we were all up to all the time. she was spared and she spoke at the south african movement demo. we told her to speak and she spoke eloquently at that and before that was at the convention where she and i were both and gary when all the civil rights people were denouncing us. the convention and gary, she was there. rosa parks was there when jimmy carter had an anniversary of round and i was speaking because i was running education and i made a freudian slip and said something about the president i didn't mean to say and she just died laughing. and please do all the time, correctly used to say to me the reason why you have to go you have
not to care, you know, detroit is bankrupt today. detroit is also bankrupted after decades of socialism. decades of social welfare state. detroit is the future of every american city. when i was a child growing up, american cities were a great treasure. today, an american cities are a wasteland. they are a wasteland because of welfare. they are a wasteland because of broken families. the tragedy that's going on in our into cities and around the country, which will spread to the suburbs where children are not raised correctly, don't have an education of don't see future, you know, where the family is broken from the beginning. these tragedies come someone has to stand up and say, this is the lie that began in the new deal. this is the lie of government dependence. don't be satisfied, as young people, to be told you are not needed. don't be satisfied to be told that somebody in china, or anywhere else, can do your jobs better than you can do them. but fight for this. and if you listen to the lie, even, socialism always comes on to help you. and then in the and it imprisoned you. obama is
, a bipartisan group of senators spoke in opposition to the measure. >> a once great city, detroit, lies in ruins. 50,000-barrel dogs from the city , abandoned houses ledger the landscape. it is a bleak and for large future that awaits detroit. creditors clamor for nearly $20 billion in debt. city employees wonder if there will be paid. there is not enough money to even replace the street lights and the trick. god forbid a major fire break out. at some level i think the president does care about detroit, but today all i can see is the billions of dollars, the billions of american tax dollars that he chooses to send overseas i see that shiny new technology, america's best going to harm people who are indifferent to us and at worst take us. the president sends billions of dollars to egypt in the form of advanced fighter planes and tanks. meanwhile, detroit's crumbles. chicago is a war zone. more people die in chicago this year than in afghanistan. if the president insists on building a $34 million board in afghanistan, hillary clinton insists on spending $80 million on a consulate in afghanistan th
, in washington, d.c., in st. louis, in kansas city, in detroit, in flint, michigan, and other areas around this -- fast food workers. they were people who work in burger king, mcdonald's, popeye, they are the ones who give you the hamburgers and the french fries. what they are saying is workers all over this country, they cannot make it on $7.25 an hour, $7.50 an hour. often they are unable to get 40 hours of work and in most cases they get no or very limited benefits. all over the country, these workers, often young people, are walking out of their establishments, their fast-food places and are educating the consumers about the economic injustice taking place in these fast-food establishments. what they are saying is we need to raise the minimum wage in this country, that american workers cannot exist on $7.25 an hour which is the national minimum wage now or $8 an hour or $9 an hour. my own view is that the very least we should be raising the minimum wage to $10 an hour. just do the arithmetic. if somebody is making $7.25 an hour and if they are lucky enough to be getting 40 hours a week
with autoworkers about how easy they'd had it finding work. i read a story in the "detroit free press" about a young guy who was pumping gas in flint, and a driver took down his name and number, and a week later he got a call telling him to report for work. gm had a couple nicknames, one was the general, and the other was generous motors because at that point, this was in the early '70s. at that point the workers had a deal where they could work for 30 years and retire on full benefits no matter what age they were, and they had health care for the rest of their lives. that's over, too, which we'll get to later. this was like employment porn. i have one anecdote in the book about one of my high school friends who came home from the army and started getting a hard time from the his dad because he didn't have a job. so my friend larry had to tell his dad kids these days don't have it as easy as you did dad. and larry said i think you have to know if everyone had the same opportunity you did to just walk into a personnel office, fill out a piece of paper, get a job the same day, we'd all be ther
. i have a two-part question for you. the first part is we know this as with the, detroit going bust or so the first part of the question is, what cities are having the renaissance you are talking about? and whitey think that this? been what cities are not? >> guest: the cities, our city story is a tale of two cities. the detroit story is sort of separate. one of the things that's lost in the discussion about detroit and our cities is city economy and fiscal health oftentimes do different things. look at new york city. new york is thriving by any definition but if you look at neighborhoods like the meatpacking district. and 70 and and 80 you wouldn't be caught dead there now. it's a casting call. it's like the place to be. that never would've happened before. sunnier kids kind of like an amusement park in many ways now where it used to be, the economist and very well. new york has fiscal problems, too. many of the same problems that detroit has. so those are two kind of different things. detroit is some of the rust belt cities are still adjusting to a massive shift in the coming from
for you. the first part is we notice as we speak detroit is going bust now. the first part of the question is what cities are having a renaissance you are talking about and why do you think that is and what cities are not? >> guest: our city stories the tale of two cities. the detroit story is sort of separate. one of the things that is lost in the discussion about detroit and our cities is the city's economy and fiscal health are oftentimes two different things. if you look at new york city new york is thriving by any definition. if you look at neighborhoods like the meatpacking district. in the 70's or 80s he wouldn't be caught dead there now looks like a casting call for the bachelorette. there are so many 20 somethings on the weekend that it's the place to be. new york is like an amusement park in many ways were the economy is doing very well. new york has fiscal problems too. many of the problems that detroit has. detroit, some of the rust belt cities are still adjusting to a massive shift in the economy from an industrial-based economy and a number of other things are happening there
-part question for you. the first part is, we notice as we speak, detroit's going bust. so, the first part of the question is, what cities are having the problems you're talking about and why do you think that is and then what cities are not? >> guest: our city story is a tail of -- tale of two cities and the detroit story is separate. one thing that is lost in the discussion about detroit and our cities is that cities' economies and fiscal health are often times two different things. you look at new york city. new york is thriving by any definition. you look at neighborhoods like the meat packing district, in the '70s and '8ss you wouldn't be caught dead there now it's so many 20 somethings on the weekend, the place to be, and that would have never happened before. so new york is like an amusement park. the economy is doing very well. but new york has fiscal problems, too. many of the same fiscal pension problems that detroit has. so those are two different things. detroit is some of the rust belt cities are adjusting to as massive shift from an industrial economy to service economy. othe
that detroit is in but not that far from it and the way they are looking to get money is by grabbing it from the suburbs and that's what they try to sneak in and that is in the right way to do things openly talking about supporting this issue and having a public debate and then the vote is fine with me. >> i'm from the university of missouri columbia and right now i am working to advocate against and hoping to stop common core. what is the detriment facing the common core? >> first i think it involves a dumbing down. common core advocates say we are actually raising the standards for a certain number of states. that is true that the idea is to find a kind of middle ground that you can pull the lowest performers up to but also effectively lowers the standards for the rest of the country. it sounds crazy when you tell people this. why would anyone want to lower standards and the reason, again i think it is a misplaced idea of equity and fairness that there is some sense that too many people who have a certain amount of money were litany certain place are getting into swap more and how we chang
that ten or 15 years ago you thought you would never see. >> host: the notice as we speak detroit is going bust so the first part of the question is what cities are having the renaissance that you are talking about and why do you think that is and then what cities are not? >> guest: it is a tale of two cities and the beach right story is separate. it's lost that the cities, economies and the fiscal health are often times to different things. you look at new york city and it is thriving by any definition. if you look at neighborhoods like the meatpacking district in the 70's and 80's he wouldn't be caught dead and now it looks like a casting call for the bachelor that it looks like bald up 20 some things on the weekend. it's the place to be and that never would have happened so new york this kind of like an amusement park for the economy is doing very well that majorca's fiscal problems, too. many of the same problems detroit had so those are two different things. detroit is some of the rust belt cities are adjusting to a massive shift in the economy from an industrial base the economy or s
had the responsibility of trying to raise two young sons on her own, and in a city of detroit, inner city boston, and then back to detroit, after she got her footing. and that was very difficult. she only had a third agreed education. she worked very hard as a domestic. leaving at 5:00 in the morning north getting home until after midnight, going from job to job to job. she just had a disdain for welfare. and the sense that she was very observant and she noticed that no one she ever saw go on it came up a of it, and she just didn't like the idea of being dependent her whole life. so she figured she would work as long and as hard as she needed to, and that somehow god would take care of her. and i was an awful student, and -- but i just loved the whole concept of medicine. anytime there was story on television or the radio about medicine, i was right there. i just loved hearing about the story. interestingly enough, a lot of the big medical breakthroughs when i was a little kid seemed to be coming out of johns hopkins so i internalized one day i wanted to work at johns hopkins. but i
a group of eight people as a hijacking family five adults and three kids from detroit hijack the plane to algeria. three very young children in the and this was a baby. it is a sad story i talk about in the book but they had to make a choice with they send the children back separate themselves so i talk about kids being along for the ride in the make very bad choices. >> you talk about the paranoia of today and what it was like and then? in beckett was a revelation especially after the epidemic because people assume the hijacker wanted to negotiate so there was the assumption i'll have to go to having an all be put up in the hotel i will have a great story from referencing get a cigar. [laughter] but in 1968 "time" magazine published a guide for its basically if you are nice they will be based in and ask to go to this hotel and there's a good deal on clothing in one thing i found out a lot of times the airlines would serve alcohol during the hijackings in the people would get wasted. [laughter] because in this particular hijacking had access to all fbi debriefings so the person was too
receiving t.a.r.p. money from the federal government of the united states and closing plants in detroit which is now bankrupt so they could open plants in china. gm, cars rolling out say buick. that plant and the joint partnership which the chinese government forces them into is 51% controlled by the shanghai automotive corporation which is controlled by the communist party of china. the only thing gm put in was all of the money and the technology and the know how. the chinese run it and, in the long run, own it. so no change there. i wallet to show you something here -- i want to show you something here. this is an oath mandated just last year for all lawyers in china, i swear to faithfully fulfill the sacred mission of legal workers in socialism with chinese characteristics. i swear my loyalty to the motherland, to the people, to uphold the leadership of the communist party. i would like to find out something, socialism with chinese characteristic, our first speaker this morning talked about national socialism. china is boast nationalistic and socialist. this is a fascist government.
if you heard this but detroit announced bankruptcy today. that is the top story today. so the goal is to have the cities find a way to grab ahold of that suburban tax money and bring it into the city. so the bottom line is that barack obama wants to redistribute the wealth of america's suburbs to the city. to see the radical file community organizers who mentored and trained barack obama all those years ago in chicago they really didn't like the suburbs. in fact their ultimate goal was literally to abolish the suburbs. why were obama's radical organizing mentors so upset about the suburbs? they blamed the suburbs for the problems of the city because when people move out to the suburbs, they take their tax money with them. so obama's radical organizers put on their thinking caps and came up with a strategy for the economic and political independence of america. and as the strategies came, a movement called the regional equity movement, the regional equity movement sometimes is just called regionalism for short. it goes under different names and you might have also heard of the idea
had the responsibility of trying to raise two younger sons on her own, in this city of detroit, later inner-city boston and back to detroit after she got her footing and that was very difficult. she only had a third grade education. she worked very hard at cleaning people's houses, leaning at 5:00 in the morning, usually not getting back before midnight going from job to job job. for some reason she had the same for welfare in the sense that she was very observant and noticed that no one she ever saw go on it came off of it and she didn't like the idea of being dependent her whole life so she figured she would work as long and as hard as she needed to and somehow god would take care of her. i was an awful students, but i loved the concept of medicine. any time there was a story on television or radio about medicine i loved hearing about the story. interestingly enough the big medical breakthroughs seemed to come out of johns hopkins. i even internalized as a little kid the one day i wanted to work at johns hopkins. i told my mother wanted to be a doctor. gee think i could be a doctor?
it is highly organized. people often don't know that las vegas is a big union town. like detroit or san francisco. a big union town. hour and have a beautiful4 per benefit package. the new york times called it the rolls-royce of benefit packages. certainly better than mine. it is free to the member. soditions are greatly different. for cocktail waitresses in northern nevada they also make minimum wage, but they get tips. and in smaller casinos you really have to work hard for tips. and cocktail waitressing is also heavy labor. you can imagine carrying naturally, it may weigh 20 or 25 pounds, wearing heels, hiking many miles per night. so a cocktail waitress in he nevada can make, you know, -- we interviewed people who were proud to make 35, $40,000 per year. in las vegas the tips are higher and cocteau waitresses and a good area of the casino can make well over 50, $60,000 per year. the union is interesting. it is a culinary union, which is part of an international unions 60,000 members in los vegas. and that is one of the largest, if not the largest local in the country. unions sometim
of passengers. that was november 1972. went three fugitives from justice to me from detroit and one of the brothers from tennessee hijack a southern airways flight over alabama. their demand was $10 million, which is by far record ransom demand. but they said that they didn't get $10 million they were going to crash the plane into the oak ridge national laboratory which has a nuclear reactor with uranium-235, which, of course, a comic bombs. urgently, what happens, they were circling around knoxville waiting for the money to be gathered by southern airways which had a hard time getting the money. eventually they get $2 million a log the back of $2 million on the plane. $2 million with 150 pounds. so these three minutes need so these three minutes need money so these three minutes need money and they're like it's $10 million, it's got to be. so fortunate it didn't bother to county. if they would realize they've been shorted by $8 million, who knows what would've happened? it end up going into cuba and their imprisoned and things don't end well for them. but after that, shortly afterw
was in detroit and the lady had a ministry to moms. she goes to the muslim house. out of the room comes another pregnant mom. and not of the room comes another pregnant mom, all pregnant by the same guy. and then another guy comes up and says, i am in the neighborhood and thoughtful, the muslim but a whole bunch of houses on the street. he is away from each one, tells them to sign up for welfare and they are all being paid for by the state. so they practice it in her house and then on their street and then a part is in their neighborhood. and then make it a community like dearborn. since they're the ones in charge, they vote muslims into the leadership and began to have their call to prayer. it takes over a puddle by the dole. an example of sharia law. in morocco, the judge ordered a girl to marry her and she committed suicide. these are political militant muslims that want to move into the west and it's important for us to grow up and realize that islam is not just a religion. it's a political military system because mohammed was not just a religious leader. >> okay, any other questions? >> ni
have seen it with one scandal after another whether you are the mayor of detroit going to jail or you are the governor of illinois it goes on and on. the just obliterate the label. but if you are a republican, it leads with republican. the republican larry craig today. and you see that coverage. it is
that las vegas is a big union down. much like detroit or san francisco, big union down. and they start at 13 or $14 an hour. and have a beautiful benefit package. "the new york times" calls it the rolls-royce of the benefit packages. it's free to the member and his or her family. so the conditions are greatly different in the two cities. for cocktail waitresses in northern nevada, they are at minimum wage but they get tips. in smaller casinos you will have to work hard for tips. and cocktail waitress and as also heavy labor. you can imagine carrying that trey 20, 25 pounds come you're wearing heels, you are hiking many miles a night. so i cocktail waitress in northern a beta can make like we interviewed people who were very proud to make 35, $40,000 a year. las vegas, the tips are higher and cocktail waitresses, who have a good shift and a good area of the casino can make well over 50, $60,000 a year. the union, what's interesting, it's a culinary union which is part of unite here which is international union. it has 60,000 members in las vegas, and that's one of the largest, if not th
-city detroit and inner-city boston. that was very difficult she only had a third grade education. she worked very hard as a domestic leaving at 5:00 in the murky -- warning not getting back before a midnight going from job to job. thin headed distain for welfare for whatever reason innocents she was very observant to notice that she notice nobody came off that went on it and did not like the idea to be dependent her whole life she thought she would work as hard and as long as she needed to and somehow god would take care of her son was also a student but i just loved the whole concept of medicine. any time there was a story on television or radio about medicine i was right there i would love to hear the story. interestingly enough i even if internalized as a little kids i would work at johns hopkins. but i told the mother of wanted to be a doctor i said you think i can be a doctor? as she would always say, you can be anything you want to me you can be the best because you are a smart boy. it took a lot for her to say that because i was not manifesting the characteristics of a smart student i
time in pennsylvania and colorado and ohio and detroit trying to understand what's happening on the ground. i want to tell you about one encounter that stuck with me. people in houston are intimately familiar with the oil and gas industries, but a lot of places where the country is being transformed are not so familiar. and one of those places that i visited while i was writing the book was in southern ohio. i went to talk to people in athens county about fracking. the first potential i met was -- person i met was warren taylor. he owned a creamery. i'd watched him speak a day earlier at the anti-fracking rally in columbus where i picked up that bandanna. and warren told me a story. he said my parents bought woodland property down here in the 1960s. a damaged world war ii vet had moved onto the property and hadn't allowed any logging since. so by the 18960s, unlike most places around here, this was a beautiful woods. taylor had mauved away and then -- moved away and then moved back and bought property next door. and he says to me, that property had won a blue ribbon at the me
ministers of detroit in connecticut it were the supposes murders of harrison and taylor and other alleged their assassination for the new york ledger but added stephen douglass to zaleski had been killed because his position in the party made him one of the against the rebellion. in representative james mitchell of ohio claimed harrison in buchanan were poison for the express purpose to put the vice president's and the presidential office. may, 19 -- mr. paige 60 an extraordinary article accused democratic conspiracy of engineering the malaria outbreak. after commenting zachary taylor fell under the vapors of washington and died because he would act honest and straightforward the tribune writers would claim that washington in subsequent years was free of malaria for democrats but when the new republican party began to gain strength it was possible they could become the ruling power were then the water was suddenly dangerous than the national hotel that dozens of heretics' almost died to death. but under the care for all soldiers during the of break the right to impeach johnson that to wit
. there was no way we were going to learn that an inner-city detroit. i mean, if they said van gogh,, they would say that jackson and the van will go. so they had no idea. i made the executive decision. i would get on the bus and go downtown for a day after day, week after week, run through the galleries. listening to my portable radio, people thought i was nuts. a black kid in motown, i tried to convince him that the motown was about this. but i can always have enough information. well, the grand championship was between harvard and yale. yale demolish harvard. so, you know, i applied there and fortunately they accepted me with a scholarship. the year that i went there, the show went off here but i still got to be honored. years later i decided that i wanted to be a neurosurgeon. and so i wanted to go to this place which was johns hopkins. all the biggest names. but they only took two people year and how was i going to get to be one of them. well, i went for my interview, the fellow photo is in charge of the residency program was also in charge of cultural affairs at the hospital. we talked and som
government must step in to ensure the state and local government. the problem detroit faced is that -- >> state, local, and tribal government. >> and tribal government. [laughter] >> okay. >> the problem with detroit, unlike many municipalities that depend on revenue from real estate tax, they run on income taxes. they never recovered from 2001. the black unemployment rate never recovered from 2001. that downturn decimated the revenue stream for the city, and it never came back. if there are banks that are too big to fail, and we have to step in to make sure they function, there are cities that are too big to fail. [applause] >> bankruptcy in one of those cities. >> yes, and so it is not enough for the administration to say, oh, we're behind you, droit. no. we said to wall street, $800 billion we're behind you, so that's being behind me. [laughter] >> okay. behind you, what are the policies? >> so, wall street caused more damage than what we have put into the budget. there needs to be a financial transaction tax because when they gamble, we lose. [applause] they have to pay
of detroit of their pensions. they worked hard for these pensions. [applause] and let me tell you something, if they, if we stand by while they take the detroiters pensions, they'll be taking our pensions. so don't think it won't happen to us. if they can set a precedent, they'll do it to us again. you know, let me just tell you this: inequality is a scourge on our society. and, yes, we're talking about low-wage workers making $7.25 an hour, we've got to do something about it. but there's the other side of that, the other side of that is that some people are doing pretty good. so between 1979 and 2007, 20, you know, a period of a it little bit less than 20 years, real income rose by 240% for those at the top 1. it's a shameful thing. it is a moral issue. and we have got to fight back at this. let me tell you this, our economy is capable be of producing -- capable of producing enough good paying jobs for everyone. [applause] our economy can do it. this economy can do it. but we can't do it while we're getting trade deals that are shipping our jobs overseas that just leaned on us if a few mon
detroit worked and experience all of its own. but there's been a marriage between the civil rights movement and the social justice movement for a long time. and as we come to this 50th anniversary, i can recall watching mr. randolph, and certainly dr. king, in that sort of electrifying speech that was given that day, and i want to go back something myrlie said earlier, and that is the movement, i mean the media has really played with our mind for a long time. you know, the most exciting part of dr. king's speech and when te that gave folks so much energy was when he talked about his dream, both for himself, his people and the nation as a whole. but dr. king said some stuff before he got to that part of the speech. that you very seldom hear folks talk about. he was just talking about we came to washington, d.c. you know, which was in a sense of promissory note written by the founders of the nation that spoke to the fact that we were entitled to some stuff. life, liberty, the pursuit of happiness. and when i heard the speech, i was a young leader, a local unit of about 5000 folks. i
, a debt overhang discourages new capital from coming in. if you don't know, think of detroit. would you lend to detroit today? no, you wouldn't because you first want to find out what's going to happen to others who lend to detroit and then to much money and so we had to do with that. then there's the longer-term agenda. it has to do with potential growth. that speaks to education. it speaks to some really microstar that we should be doing and that right now, one of the problems about the fed leaning the center of attention come is it the first discussion away from all these other things. so everybody focus on the fed cup who should be the fed chairperson, et cetera, et cetera. this whole set of other things that needs to be more important for us, answer me for the next generation, that the whole narrative has been shifted away from. >> mohammad, the white house global economics, what types of new projects are you working on, ideas, perhaps for 2014? >> so, you have promoted me. okay, i'm very privileged to be chair of the council on global development. and the notion is very simple. is
to see if there's a baby there, and fortunately there was no baby in the car. and the man was detroited -- decorated by the town in florida for heroism, a insurance company also gave him an award. seven years later, this man, his name is scott prouty was working for a bartender as a catering company in south florida, and he is told along with the others what the catering company that bill clinton had been in the area repeatedly for a fund-raiser and had his picture taken. and this particular event was for romney, and he brought his camera along. i think you know some of the rest of the story. [laughter] i tell in in detail. i try to convey the motivation. in some ways it goes back to the event in the everglades. at one point after many hours of conversation, scott said to me, you know, i learned that night that if you can jump in, you must jump in. he was going do what it took to prevent romney from becoming president. this was all in a class context because what actually really first enraged scott that night was not the 47% which came later in the 48-minute tape, but some very complime
that is highly organized people often don't know that boss vegas is a big uniontown like detroit or san francisco there they may start at 13 or $14 per hour and half a beautiful benefits package called the rolls-royce of benefit packages it is free to the member and for his or her family. so as the conditions are greatly different between the two cities. the cocktail waitresses in northern nevada also make minimum wage but they get tips. in a lot of the casinos you really have to work hard for the tips in the cocktail waitress is also head the labor you can imagine carrying that tray 25 pounds wearing high heels walking many miles per night so a cocktail waitress and northern nevada we interviewed people who were proud to make 35 or $40,000 per year but it's in loss vegas the tips are higher in the cocktail waitresses with a big shift in a big area of the casino could make well over 50 or $60,000 per year. is interesting is the culinary union which is international has 60,000 members in las vegas that is the largest local in the country. but the culinary union really isn't a large part due to the
think it's a real honor to be invited to speak at the detroit economic club at how many people can say my younger brother also spoke at the detroit economic forum and his brother john zogby who i mentioned earlier was here in the fall i believe in september and spoke before us. so we are very happy to have both of you here. they have been very successful with presidential elections but what i think is particularly significant here is that they have been very successful in conducting polls and measuring opinion in countries outside of the united states which has what he is going to talk about today. they correctly called in 2000 when the israeli election of ariel sharon, the 2000 mexican election of felipe a. calderon in 2006 and they have conducted numerous polls in arab countries. so i suppose -- something like predictions are very difficult especially those involving the future. they seem to have a good knack at predicting the future and i know it's through very hard work that they can get there. in 1993 vice president al gore appointed dr. zogby to lead elders for peace following th
court case of a couple of years ago and, obviously, municipal concerns like the city of detroit. define for us what exactly is eminent domain? >> guest: well, thank you, bill. and, again, it's a pleasure to be back on "washington journal." eminent domain is the power of government to take private property. it's actually a very old power. kings in europe exercised it hundreds of years ago. garage -- gradually the custom arose that people have to be compensated when their property was taken. and it was certainly an attribute of the british crown. so after the revolution the states had the power, and interestingly the fifth amendment to the federal constitution says that nor shall private property be taken without just compensation. it doesn't actually give the federal government the power, it simply assumes that as a sovereign the federal government has that power. >> and was that fifth amendment built into the constitution based on the experiences of the colonies with the crown? >> well, this is a very fascinating point because the crown had abused the colonies in, many ways. so you have
and the loss of more than half of detroit's population as a result. 8:00 eastern, booktv in prime time. tonight the focus on book fairs and festivals of the past year, including a discussion from the harlem book fair, and a look at the book, "stalin secrets," author ann romney and a book about whitty bulger. we'll -- >> i'm not some sort of anti-suburb person who thinks everyone needs to live in new york city and, you know i was very sensitive to be coming across as a sort of a espresso-sipping, condo-dwelling elitist of sometime. that is not why i did this book. i understand why people like the suburbs. i get fed up with a lot of daily life in new york city a lot. i was more drawn, the trend were so undeniable. the fact there is a shift the way suburban america perceived by people that live there is too big of a story to ignore. >> the earliest extent letter we have, dates to october 1762 and we call it the miss adorable letter because that is how john adams opens the letter. so it is john writing to abigail and he says, miss adorable, by the same token that the bearer here of sat up with laws
for the administration to say, oh, we're behind you, detroit. no. we said to wall street $800 billion we're behind you, so that's being behind me. [laughter] >> okay. mark -- [inaudible] that's behind you. what would be some of those policies? >> so wall street caused more damage than what we have put into the budget. there needs to be a financial transaction tax, because when they -- [applause] we lose. and they have to pay for cleaning up the whole mess. not just their mess, not just the mess that let them get their jobs back, get their bonuses back and then argue for a tax cut after they got their bonuses and we saved their bankrupt companies. if we saved aig that was bankrupt, we can save detroit that's bankrupt. and if aig who caused the downturn in the first place could get a bonus because it stated in their contract they had to get a bonus, then detroit city workers can get a pension just hike it said in their contract. [applause] .. which of course makes the united states different and unique from other countries in the world supporting the immigrants now no other country even comes close. but
to these places? why not bring them to places and tell them about detroit and about trayvon martin. tel dan about america. but it's in the future. it's not now. obviously it was a major bulwark triet for this book, they took the private archive and there was a terrific conversation in the archives where his leadership is sitting around in 1991 and january and they are saying they are not going to bomb us. one of the smartest advisers says we are the soviets. so we are falling at. why aren't they going along with it? that is a very interesting insight because actually forget 91. by the 80's the soviet union have actually become less for the popular struggles around the world because it had fallen into a deep crisis. so it was the other set of documents i don't quote enough of them is that your discussions around afghanistan which are available at the national center the archives in washington, d.c.. those are fascinating because there you have the senior leadership. at one point they say they cannot go into afghanistan because their friends would be angry. they recognize it does not exist. but we
. then writing business, then i was at detroit for seven years. so all of our children, all three have michigan birth certificates. then i ended up at "forbes" a cup the of times and ended up here and there. then i ended up at "newsweek" and i thought i would be there forever. that didn't quite work out. five years ago i went to fortune. again, i'm the polar opposite of jeff i knocked around. went a public college. i was raised in big city. sister sort of fun. -- it's sort of fun. >> host: when did you first start talking to one another about? how long? >> guest: not long ago. there was some day in august. >> guest: it was the last thursday in july. i was going away for the month of august on vacation. >> guest: right. >> guest: thursday our boss comes to me and says you and geoff are going do this. on that friday we had lunch and we started working on it. >> host: has there been so far any strong reaction? if there has what is it? >> guest: we've had a tremendous amount of reaction. i can't recall getting a
of when they think of boston politics. >> what other races are you keeping an eye on? >> one is detroit. field ofthis candidates narrowed in a runoff to just two contenders for a job which is very important right now. the election itself may be less important compared to what happens after the election. how much power the mayor will even have when there is an emergency manager with sweeping authority. there is also houston. a democratic mayor is running a republicanerm opponent. she was elected mayor of houston, it became the largest american city with an openly gay mayor. you wouldy necessarily stereotype houston, texas. texas, it is worth keeping an eye on what happens there. if you cover politics and policy in this era of budget -- >> you cover politics and policy. what can mayor is expected from washington regarding infant -- regarding infrastructure, the nuts and bolts. >> you talk to mirrors over the country -- you talk to mi ayors and they are fed up with how little support they get from washington. certainty.ally no stimulusof ways, the that a lot of folks credit with helping gi
've got to say, you cannot rob the people of detroit of the pension. they worked hard for these pensions. and let me tell you something, if we stand by what they take the detroit pension they will be taking our pensions. so don't think it will happen to us. if they can set a precedent, they will do it to us again. let me just tell you this. inequality is a scourge on our society. and yes, we're talking about low-wage workers making $7.25 an hour. we've got to do something about it. but there's the other side of that, the other side of that is that some people are doing pretty good. so between 1979-2007, a period, although less than 20 years, real income rose by 240% for those at the top 1%. it's a shameful thing. it is a moral issue. and we've got to fight back at this. let me tell you, our economy is capable of producing enough good paying jobs for everyone. [applause] our economy could do it. this economy can do it. but we can't do it while we're getting trade deals that are shipping our jobs overseas, that just leaned on us a few months ago for the south korea the other said it will c
was identified at from detroit. heron and morris are on the ballot to be recalled because of deep objections by their constituents to particularly the gun grabbing votes that they cast some would say at the behest of the new york mayor michael bloomberg in this last legislative session. it's never been in the history of colorado that state legislators have been fired by we the people on the recall in midterm. that's what he means about september 10th. >> indeed. [applause] >> i think it's interesting just on the topic of new york city that you have a mayor now that is like a slurpee grabber and might be replaced by the most famous amateur photographer. >>> we will have more on the future of the political party tonight on c-span town hall. these programs and a variety of topics air live each tuesday, wednesday and thursday from seven to 9 p.m. eastern throughout the congressional recess. republican national committee chairman rights on the rising stars program today on the meeting in boston. we will have that live on c-span this morning at 11:15 eastern canadian alliance for health reform hol
to discussions in the black study center. paul kuntzler was born in detroit, michigan, in 1941 and raised at grosse pointe there before moving to washington, d.c. in 1951, he was active with the michigan young democrats and the congress on racial he called it. he credits john f. kinney as a major influence on his political consciousness. iin december 19 city with a move to washington, d.c. just days before his 20th birthday. he attended both the northern virginia center of the university of virginia and george mason university. for 32 years he was on the senior staff of the national science speakers association as assistant executive director for advertising exhibits an exhibitor workshops. in 1962, he was elected to the board of directors of the society of washington, the districts first gay-rights group. on april 17, 1965, he was one of 10 people in the world's first gay-rights picket in front of the white house. he is also one of the founders of the gay and lesbian activists alliance. he has an incredible memory are displayed by his tendency to recall events not just by the day but dow
and detroit last week? >> you know, you find this all very well, bill. i think it's so important, as tommy said, to put things in context. when i go back to those years, it was an extraordinary time in american fiscal history. i will never forget being called to an emergency meeting in the fall of 2008 to the majority leader's office. i was the last to arrive because i didn't chairing a meeting on energy and another part of the capitol complex. and i walked in, and there were maybe 16, 17 people in the room, leaders of the house and senate, republicans and democrats. the chairman of the federal reserve and the sector of the treasure of the bush administration. and it was about 6:00 in the evening. they actually posted a guard at the door and close the door. it was very unusual, as you know. and i knew something dramatic was afoot. and i sat down, and the meeting began. secretary of the treasure in the chairman of the federal reserve told us they were taking over aig, the large insurance company the next day if they made very clear they were not there to seek our advice or approval. they we
as we have seen in europe and detroit last week? >> you frame this very well. i think it's a important as said to put things in context. when i go back to those years, it was an extraordinary time in american fiscal history. i will never forget being called to an emergency meeting in the fall of 2008 to the majority leader's office. they had been chairing the meeting on energy in another part of the capitol complex. i walked in and there may be 16 or 17 people in the room and in the house and the senate, republicans and democrats. the psychiatry of the treasury and the bush administration was about 6 o'clock in the evening they posted a guard at the door and closed the door. it was very unusual, as you know. and i knew something dramatic was afoot. i sat down and the meeting began. the secretary of the treasury and the federal reserve told us they were taking over the large insurance company the next day and they made very clear they were out there to seek our advice or approval. they were there to inform us they were taking the steps and they told us that if they did not do it they be
americans died over the city of detroit. only then was that a political will to say we now need to use 21st century technology which we have against the terrorists. so if you look at it right now in a world where they only have to be right 1% of the time we have to be right 100% of the time on defense we should use one of our few at images which is technology and the vast majority of the explosive detection systems in place today aren't capable of detecting either this type of clothing soaked in liquid explosives nor are they capable of detecting even say the surgically implanted bombs or something as basic as the underwear bomber. most are designed to do -- magnetometers detect metal. that is not the explosive itself. usually the only medal medal involved as the detonator so if you are able to designed explosives with no metal detector, you effectively have made that system. we are living in the stone age's on most of the magnetometer technology we are using. our one advantage which is bring for this modern advanced imaging technology to allow us to level the playing field in the last thin
them to places and say talk about yemen? why not bring them to places and tell them about detroit, them them about trayvon martin, tell them about america. so that, i think, is how solidarities are produced. but it's in the future, it's not now. i mean, obviously, the ussr was a major bulwark, and, by the way, for this book i read a very interesting -- when americans took baghdad, they took saddam's private archives. saddam used to tape all his conversations. there is a terrific conversation in the saddam archives where his top leadership is sitting around in 1991 in january, and they are saying the americans are just not going to bomb us. one of his smartest advisers said the issue is not the american issue, where are the soviets? soviet union hadn't fallen yet. where is where are the soviets? why are they going to along with that? actually, forget '91. by the '80s the soviet union had actually become less of a bulwark for pop list struggles around the world. soviet union had gone into deep crisis. in fact, the other set of documents i read for this book, i don't quote enough of them,
of peace over that okay so this is industry. this is a buildup industry from detroit that says what is competing with the best of the best so it's just a mindset or look at tablets. tablets have been ubiquitous for a long time but you know legacy systems like airlines and car manufactures are just starting to put them into -- to adopt them. now if industry competes with a lot of other competitors internationally it takes this long to bring these technological innovations and adopt them with their products the government is the monopoly takes a little bit longer. so the biggest challenge that i see and thank you that was a great question is how do you keep quality control but find a way to rush the market or whatever the appropriate terminology is for the government technologies or even just nontechnological innovations that could help make your product or your service better. >> i would just simply say i think we covered it earlier. the egger span is the fear of failure and not being able to learn from failure and that i think goes through government in terms of personnel systems, i
million of our residents are on food stamps today. one in three households in detroit, according to the associated press, four out of five u.s. adults struggle with joblessness, near porveghts or reliance on welfare. there's no shortage of labor in the united states. there is a shortage of jobs in the united states. our goal must be to help our struggling americans move from dependency to independence, to help them find steady jobs and rising pay, not declining pay. our policy cannot be to simply relegate more and more of our citizens to dependence on the government while importing a steady stream of foreign workers to take the available jobs. that is not in the interest of our country or the people of this country. some contend our unemployed don't have the needed skills. well, let's train them. we now spend over $750 billion a year on means-tested welfare assistance-type programs. that's the largest item in the budget, bigger than social security, bigger than defense, bigger than medicare. and of that amount, we spend about -- for every $100 we spend on those programs, we only
painful constraints to calm as we have seen in europe and detroit last week? >> you no, you framed this all very well. i think it's so important as tommy said to put things in context. when i go back to those years, it was an extraordinary time in american fiscal history. i will never forget being called to an emergency meeting in the fall of 2008 to the majority leader's office. i was the last to arrive because i had been chairing a meeting on energy and another part of the capitol complex and i walked then and there were 16 or 17 people in the room leaders in the house and senate republicans and democrats. the chairman of the federal reserve and the secretary of the treasury of the bush administration and it was about 6:00 in the evening. they actually posted a guard at the door and close the door. it was very unusual as you know. i knew something dramatic was afoot. and i sat down and the meeting began. this degree of the treasure in the chairman of the federal reserve told us they were taking over aig the large insurance company the next day. they made very clear they were not
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